The natural path to net-zero

Symposium 2021


This key event of the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry will take place in a digital format with distinguished speakers from 14 to 18 June.

Based on the success of the event in 2020, the eurammon Symposium will once again be held as an online event this year.

The 2021 symposium will feature online lectures and discussions focusing on questions about the natural path to net-zero emissions. After all, the energy consumption levels for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector are expected to double by 2030. The symposium will illustrate how efficient, climate-friendly cooling can support the energy sector's transition to net-zero emissions. To address this important topic with the required expertise, eurammon has invited high-profile speakers from business, politics and science who will shed light on the topic from different perspectives.

Following three keynote speeches on the first day, the focus will be on the application areas in supermarkets, warehousing, food and beverage refrigeration as well as district heating/cooling with the help of case studies. In addition, the challenges in terms of training in the use of natural refrigerants will be discussed on one of the lecture days.

"Last year, over the course of six days, around 500 participants – politicians, international organisations, operators, planners, plant engineers – and 15 experts took part virtually in the first digital edition of the eurammon Symposium, more individuals than ever before. Of course, this was also due to the digital format, which enabled easy participation without the complications and expense of travel. With the Corona pandemic still on our minds, we are again pleased to be hosting a digital Symposium with as many participants as possible," says Rob Lamb of Star Refrigeration Ltd., chairman of the Steering Committee of eurammon e.V.

The detailed programme and registration form is available here.

Participation is free of charge via MS Teams. Registered participants will receive the dial-in link shortly before the respective lecture days.

The presentations will be available for download on the eurammon website www.eurammon.com after the event.

presentations

Ian Arbon, Engineered Solutions

Is 'decarbonisation' enough to achieve 'net zero' by 2050?

Ákos Murin, QPLAN

Planned district heating and cooling with heat pumps in Budapest

Max Farrell, LDN Collective

Net-zero towns and cities

Lukas Patryarcha and Marco Rozgic, Wurm GmbH & Co. KG Elektronische Systeme

Controling and monitoring supermarkets supported by data science

Oliver Ziegler, Technische Universität Dresden

CHPC in supermarkets - about resorption refrigeration systems and their contribution to sector coupling

Thomas Kolster, Danfoss Climate Solutions

IoT, monitoring and integrated controls in supermarkets

Marco Buoni, AREA

Training in installing and maintaining systems keeping the high designed efficiency

Alexander Krimmel, Europäische Studienakademie Kälte-Klima-Lüftung

Training in RACHP: What are the challenges and what is being done

Stina Forsberg, Temper Technology AB

Handbook for secondary refrigeration systems

Christine Weiker, ECSLA, Simon Hirzel, Fraunhofer ISI

ICCEE: Improving Cold Chain Energy Efficiency

John Clark, Star Refrigeration Ltd.

Ethos performance management - case studies for warehouse and food production

Tim Moran, Lineage Logistics Holding LLC

Rethinking the way temperature-controlled warehouses consume energy

Stefan Jensen, Scantec Refrigeration Technologies Pty. Ltd.

Best practice energy performance for refrigerated warehouses

Jelle Wagelmans, Evapco Europe BVBA

How thermal ice storage can assist to balance the European power grid in the future

Thomas Lergenmüller, GEA Refrigeration Germany GmbH

Heat to cool: sustainable and efficient heat pump solutions

Alexander Cohr Pachai, Johnson Controls Denmark ApS

What role will heat pumps play in a decarbonised future?

Karsten Beermann, IKKE gGmbH

Training on natural refrigerants and RACHP

Downloads


News

  • Intro

    the natural path to net-zero emissions

    The 2021 symposium will feature online lectures and discussions focusing on questions about the natural path to net-zero emissions. After all, the energy consumption levels for the refrigeration and air conditioning sector are expected to double by 2030. The symposium will illustrate how efficient, climate-friendly cooling can support the energy sector's transition to net-zero emissions. We asked Rob Lamb, Marketing and Sales Director Star Refrigeration and Chairmann Steering Committee eurammon , what his views are on this year`s symposium topic:

    Why is the focus on net zero this year?
    Climate change is already happening. We are running out of time to limit its effect over the rest of this century and for future generations around the world. If we take action now, there is hope. The RACHP industry is responsible for around 7% of total global emissions. Increasing temperatures and a growing global population will result in an increase in the need for cooling and heat pumps. It is crucial that future systems limit their direct and indirect emissions of greenhouse gases. We have the COP26 event in Glasgow in November where current climate change progress will be reviewed and new targets set. This is the ideal time for eurammon members to discuss the key role natural refrigerants will play in achieving the target of net zero by 2050.

    Because governments are now setting climate targets?
    Net zero is important to prevent a global catastrophe in terms of climate change. eurammon has always been focused on using natural refrigerants as they don’t damage the environment and at the same time reduce energy consumption through improved efficiency. With governments now focused on climate change and looking for solutions, this is the ideal time to be raising natural refrigerants and the key role they can play within our market sector

    What can attendees expect from this year`s symposium?
    I’m hoping that those who attend will learn about and discuss the steps necessary to move towards net zero in our market sector. There will be the chance to hear from those involved in policy making and planning to understand what the future may look like. We will also hear from operators on the challenges they face and the help they require. All of this will help us shape what needs to be done. I hope we can have an open and honest discussion on what is needed and the role natural refrigerants need to play in shaping the net zero future of cooling and heating.

  • Day 1, June 14th (1)

    Prof Ian M. Arbon CEng CEnv

    The first day of the symposium on June 14, 2021, will begin with two high-profile keynotes that will highlight the topic of "net zero" from different angles.

    Prof Ian M. Arbon CEng CEnv and Max Farrell, Founder & CEO, the London Collective will speak on the following topics:

    Prof Ian M. Arbon  CEng  CEnv

    Engineered Solutions

    Ian Arbon is a Chartered Mechanical Engineer, a Registered European Engineer and a Chartered Environmentalist, with an MSc in ‘Renewable Energy and the Environment’ and an MBA.  Formerly MD of several UK engineering-sector manufacturing companies (including Howden Compressors Ltd), he now runs Engineered Solutions, a Sustainable Engineering and Management consultancy.  Ian is a Fellow of IMechE; as a Founder and past Chair of its Energy, Environment & Sustainability Group, he has a long history in spearheading the Institution’s work in sustainable development; among other relevant reports, he was Lead Author of the Institution’s Reports (2009 & 2020) on ‘The Energy Hierarchy’.  He is also a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the Energy Institute, the Institute of Refrigeration and the Institution of Engineers in Scotland. He has been a Visiting Professor in Alternative Energy at Newcastle University, an Honorary Professor in Sustainable Energy at the University of Glasgow and is currently a Visiting Professor in the Centre for Energy Policy at the University of Strathclyde.

    Keynote: Is ‘decarbonisation’ enough to achieve ‘net zero’ by 2050?

    Everyone is now familiar with the 2016 Paris Agreement’s ambitions for ‘net zero’ greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2050.  But is the concept of ‘decarbonisation’ adequate to do this, or is it just another form of ‘greenwash’?   Ian Arbon draws from his decades of experience in sustainable development, renewable energy and climate change mitigation/adaptation to examine whether various governments’ largely technology-based policies are likely to have the desired outcomes. 

    Using sustainability tools, particularly IMechE’s ‘Energy Hierarchy’, typical technology-based ‘decarbonisation’ policies are assessed (specifically the newly-released IEA Report, to consider if they are able to meet the sheer scale of the task and if not, to propose what other measures might be necessary to achieve a successful outcome.  In particular, Ian suggests ways in which, through ‘behaviour change’ and ‘energy demand reduction’, we can all help to achieve climate change mitigation, rather than simply wait for governments and MNCs to take the limited measures they have so far proposed.

  • Day 1, June 14th (2)

    Max Farrell Founder & CEO, the London Collective

    Max Farrell
    Founder & CEO, the London Collective

    Max Farrell is Founder & CEO of the London Collective, a network of built environment experts and creatives fighting to improve people’s lives and the planet’s prospects. Their members are experts in social impact, zero carbon and modern methods of construction (MMC) as well as architecture, engineering, graphic design and film-making. They are a radical and agile ‘one stop shop’ for projects anywhere in the world.

    Max was Project Leader and Author of the Farrell Review of Architecture and the Built Environment, commissioned by the UK Government, which made 60 recommendations spanning education, outreach & skills; design quality; cultural heritage; economic benefits & architecture policy, many of which have now been implemented. In 2020 he co-authored Collectively Speaking: The Future of Town Centres Post-Coronavirus published by the Developer Magazine. In January 2021, Max was appointed Chair of the Cultural Co-Location Advisory Group for Creative Estuary. He is an adviser to London National Park City, Urban Design London, the Place Alliance, the Urban Room Network and the National Arts and Place Consortium.

     

    Keynote: Net Zero Towns and Cities

     

    The most important issue we are facing is climate change and the role that cities have to play, which are by far the biggest contributors to carbon emissions and the climate emergency we are facing. In the last year, COVID-19 has accelerated change in terms of city making. There have been major shifts in the use of technology, with people working, learning and shopping from home, whilst rediscovering local centres, walking and cycling more and moving away from dependency on cars. The London Collective previously masterplanned the UKs first eco town at NW Bicester, which is the first true zero carbon development to be built in terms of regulated and unregulated emissions. We are currently working on the first new town in the UK to have a total response to the climate emergency in its DNA, in South Oxfordshire. As well as being zero carbon we are increasing biodiversity, addressing nitrogen in the air and water, enabling local food production and creating local mobility hubs. This talk will look at the future of net zero towns and cities based on exemplary projects that are driving the agenda.

  • day 2, June 15th

    Supermarkets with system integration of heating and cooling

    The second day of the Symposium on June 15th, is dedicated to the topic “Supermarkets with system integration of heating and cooling”. There will be four different presentations, each highlighting a different aspect of the subject. The first presentation will be given by Prof. André Thess, who is working on new methods of energy peering. In the second presentation, Dr. Lukas Patryarcha & Dr. Marco Rozgic will present an insight into the realized and compatible R744 system concepts with WURM solutions, they will demonstrate their online platform Frigodata Online 2.0 and they will show how it can be used. The third presentation will be held by Oliver Ziegler and will highlight the technology of the resorption refrigeration system, as well as its implementation in the heating, cooling and electricity network of a supermarket and will address the energy costs and CO2 savings of the entire system. Thomas Kolster will hold the last presentation, where we will dive into the various levers and provide concrete examples of how supermarkets across the world are applying these technologies to reach higher efficiency and performance.

    Carnot Batteries for the Storage of Electricity, Heat and Cold – Prof. André Thess

    Controlling and Monitoring Supermarkets supported by Data Science – Dr. Lukas Patryarcha & Dr. Marco Rozgic

    On the natural path to net zero, in addition to natural refrigerants like R744, integral RACHP systems are mainly used in supermarket. The R744 refrigeration system landscape is characterized by systems from different generations and of varying size, energy efficiency demands (e.g., ejectors, parallel compression, semi-flooding), safety, heat recovery, heat pumps and oil management.

    Almost every operator maintains a portfolio of refrigeration systems that can differ significantly from each other and in which WURM is represented with a few, modular control solutions in over 4500 R744 systems. In this presentation you will get an insight into the realized and compatible R744 system concepts with WURM solutions.

    Further, we demonstrate our online platform Frigodata Online 2.0, designed to present all the information about our costumers’ markets, ensuring general overview over all projects as well as detailed analysis of a single project.

    We show, how it can be used to monitor consumption, gather technical status information and how our cutting-edge data storage and data management strategies allow for the application of machine learning, providing smart assistance tools, to quickly identify optimization potentials.

    CHPC in supermarkets - About resorption refrigeration systems and their contribution to sector coupling – Oliver Ziegler

    What does sector coupling mean and in what capacity are we allowed to refer to it? If we consider a supermarket, the consumption and the capacity of the installed machines for the final energy supply already represent a small district. Like in other districts, it is possible to identify load profiles in the supermarket, which show daily, weekly and annual rhythms in their behavior.

    In a research project, it was shown that resorption refrigeration systems can be used in combination with a CHP unit, even in the area of low thermal output, to reduce primary energy consumption while smoothing peak loads and thus contributing to the guiding principles of sector coupling.

    This presentation will highlight the technology of the resorption refrigeration system, as well as its implementation in the heating, cooling and electricity network of a supermarket and will address the energy costs and CO2 savings of the entire system.

    IoT, monitoring and integrated controls in supermarkets – Thomas Kolster

    • Danfoss is engaged in many applications that optimize supermarket performance (from refrigeration systems with natural refrigerants to heat reclaim and much more)
    • The path to net zero supermarkets is realistic but it requires different levers (eg. efficient refrigeration systems, smart energy management, continuous monitoring through IoT)
    • The maturity of digital technologies like IoT introduces additional opportunities to optimize store performance
    • By connecting assets in the supermarket to the cloud the supermarket can leverage valuable data across refrigeration, AC, lighting and other electronic assets
    • Coupled with domain expertise this data can be turned into valuable insights that can improve store efficiency and performance
    • In this lecture we will dive into the various levers and provide concrete examples of how supermarkets across the world are applying these technologies to reach higher efficiency and performance
  • Day 3, June 16th

    Training in RACHP

    The third day of the Symposium, which will take place on June 16, will be devoted to the topic of “Training in RACHP”. As on the second day, four different presentations will take place, each highlighting a different aspect. Marco Buoni will be the first speaker. He will present the importance of good installation and maintenance in high-efficiency systems using alternative refrigerants and the competence needed to reach those goals. Karsten Beermann as the second speaker of the day will give an overview of the content of the EU-blended e-learning programme REAL Alternatives 4 Life. The e-learning programme consists of 9 modules in which in the introduction the topics safety, efficiency, reliability and good practice concerning the use of alternative refrigerants will be described. The third speaker will be Prof. Alexander Krimmel., which will present the challenges about the Training in RACHP and what is being done. The last presentation of the day will be held by Stina Forsberg. She will talk about the secondary systems Handbook, which is currently being developed by a group commissioned by eurammon.

    Training in installing and maintaining systems keeping the high designed efficiency – Marco Buoni
    As part of the European Green Deal and decarbonisation process, EU is aiming to reach 55% reduction in emissions in 9 years and carbon neutrality by 2050. HVACR systems have an important role and they are essential to modern life as defined even more clearly in the past pandemic year. This presentation would like to present the importance of good installation and maintenance in high-efficiency systems using alternative refrigerants and the competence needed to reach those goals.

    Training on natural refrigerants and RACHP – Karsten Beermann
    The presentation will give an overview of the content of the EU-blended e-learning programme REAL Alternatives 4 Life (www.realalternatives.eu). The e-learning programme consists of 9 modules in which in the introduction the topics safety, efficiency, reliability and good practice concerning the use of alternative refrigerants (natural fluids) will be described.
    In separate modules the safety & risk management, the system design, containment and leak detection, maintenance & repair, retrofitting, checklist of legal obligation and environmental impacts in handling of alternative refrigerants in refrigeration systems are explained.
    This programme is available in 17 languages. With an assessment process at national leads in the different countries the learners can be officially certified according the “REAL Alternatives-Program“.


    Training in RACHP: What are the challenges and what is being done – Prof. Dr. Alexander Krimmel
    The dual vocational education system in Germany is shortly presented, which is complemented by dual and traditional study programmes. The current dynamic technological developments represent educational challenges, both curricular and methodologically. This area of conflict is highlighted. Finally, some aspects of training in RACHP at an international level are considered.

    Handbook for secondary refrigeration systems – Stina Forsberg
    Requirements to reduce the quantity of primary refrigerant and the need to limit the primary refrigerant charge to the refrigeration equipment room has increased the need for secondary systems. To increase the knowledge for secondary systems eurammon has within its Technical committees assigned a group to develop a Handbook for secondary systems. The Handbook is currently being developed to give guidance in for example designing and maintenance of systems and includes different chapters like System design, Choice of components and Heat transfer fluids.

  • day 4, June 17th

    Temperature-controlled warehousing

    The fourth day of the Symposium, June 17th, will revolve the topic “Temperature-controlled warehousing”. There will be four different presentations, each highlighting a different aspect of the subject. The first presentation will be given by Christine Weiker, who will give a European Overview. In the second presentation, John Clark will demonstrate why boosting equipment efficiencies is so important to reach net zero. In the third presentation, Tim Moran will talk about the topic of lineage. Stefan Jensen will be the last speaker of the day and discusses an empirical best practice energy performance benchmark for mixed refrigerated warehouses.

    European Overview – Christine Weiker

    Ethos performance management - Case studies for warehouse and food production – John Clark
    Is equipment working the way the designer intended? In our experience every system has some optimisation to pursue, existing plant and even some recently commissioned systems also. Thankfully most actions don’t need large capital expenditure. They could include optimising control set points or some targeted maintenance.
    If we are going to reach net zero, then boosting equipment efficiency and smarter operation is essential. Effectively communicated data analysis can be key, however the commitment of stakeholders to take action and drive savings is of equal importance.
    Star Data Analytics will share their experience and cover the journey of data collection, digital twin, analysis, communication and opportunities.

    Lineage – Tim Moran

    Best Practice Energy Performance for Refrigerated Warehouses – Stefan Jensen
    The presentation will discuss an empirical best practice energy performance benchmark for mixed refrigerated warehouses. On the basis of recorded specific energy consumption (SEC) values in kWh per m³ refrigerated volume per year, it will be postulated that an energy conservation potential of around 75% exists within the existing global stock of mixed refrigerated distribution centres (RDC’s). By way of several practical examples, it will be demonstrated that replacement of existing average efficiency refrigerating plant with new modern plant compliant with the empirical best practice energy performance benchmark is financially viable. The conclusion will discuss the future technical viability or otherwise of refrigerating plant concepts that have been in widespread use for the last 60-70 years.

  • day 5, June 18th

    Cooling and heating for food and beverage production / District cooling/heating

    Cooling and heating for food and beverage production / District cooling/heating
    On June 18th, the fifth day of the Symposium, we discuss the topic “Cooling and heating for food and beverage production / District cooling/heating”. There will be four different presentations, each highlighting a different aspect of the subject. The presentation by Jelle Wagelmans will highlight the use of Thermal Ice Storage in cooling systems, which can reduce peak power demand and shift part of the power demand to off-peak periods. In the second presentation, Thomas Lergenmüller will explain why heat pumps are becoming so important – also for industrial applications. Akos Murin. Alex Pachai will hold the last presentation, in which he discusses climate chance and the opportunities that heat pumps bring.

    How Thermal Ice Storage can assist to balance the European power grid in the future – Jelle Wagelmans
    Friday 8th of January 2021: the day the European continent came close to a massive blackout. Incidents like this will become more frequent in the future as big coal, gas and nuclear power plants are replaces by thousands of smaller wind and solar units. Storage of excess energy in megabatteries is a possible solution but thermal ice storage can provide a more environmental friendly and sustainable alternative for many applications.
    Heating and cooling in buildings and industry account for half of the energy consumed in the European Union. Cooling represents a fairly smaller share but the cooling demand from households and businesses, such as the food industry, is increasing rapidly. This trend is linked to the climate change and the increase of the ambient temperature which is used for the design of cooling equipment.
    The use of Thermal Ice Storage in cooling systems will allow a reduction in the peak power demand and shift part of the power demand to off-peak periods (night time).
    Natural refrigerants like ammonia can be integrated in these cooling system designs for different type of applications, from district cooling to food processing.

    Heat to cool: Sustainable and efficient GEA heat pump solutions – Thomas Lergenmüller
    Why are heat pumps becoming so important also for industrial applications?
    Because they are an integral piece of the decarbonization puzzle.
    More than 90 % of the thermal energy demand relates to district heating but mainly to process heating demands. While this energy is most supplied by fossil fueled combustion systems, heat pumps are electric driven and can thus be fed through electricity from regenerative sources.
    GEA is a component and solutions supplier for process technology, and within the Refrigeration Technologies division offers industrial cooling and heating equipment. The division is looking back at nearly two decades of experience with industrial heat pump projects and is constantly developing its portfolio and know-how.
    Besides reliability, the efficiency of heat pumps is a central focus.  The efficiency, or the COP for heat pumps as the ratio of useable energy output (heating capacity) by necessary input (driving power), influences the energy consumption hence the total costs of ownership, and last but not least the CO2 emissions in case the electricity is not “100 % green”.  How efficient a heat pump is, depends on several factors.  Besides the individual quality and efficiency of single components like the compressor, the heat exchangers, but also the controller, it is also the whole design of the heat pump, particularly the set-up of the heat exchangers on the hot side which transfer the heating energy to a consumer, that can have a significant impact on the efficiency.  Last but not least, the refrigerant too plays an important role.  The natural refrigerant Ammonia for example, provides very good volumetric efficiency characteristics and thanks to the zero global warming potential and zero ozone depletion potential, it is not and will not be affected by the F-gas regulation which step-by-step phases out hydrocarbon refrigerants and HFC’s.
    When previously, during the planning of the production plants, refrigeration engineers would take care of the refrigeration part and then perhaps at a much later stage and detached from the refrigeration decision makers simply add boilers to cover heating demands, the approach nowadays is and should be holistic.  This means taking all temperature levels and capacity demands into consideration in the first place.  Waste heat from refrigeration processes (condensation) can be re-used and boosted to a higher level useable for heating demands.
    Being able to provide suitable, reliable and efficiency-optimized equipment, GEA is supplying a growing demand for sustainable solution.  Ecologic, economic, political and social parameters drive decision makers and industries towards sustainability.  More and more “CO2-free” factory projects pop up.  GEA Berlin too has an ambitious plan to reach net CO2-neutrality in 2030.  Among several measures, implementing heat pumps is a key course of action.

    „Southern City Gate” project in Budapest – Akos Murin

    What role will heat pumps play in a decarbonised future? – Alexander Cohr Pachai
    The industry has understood the demand on CO2 emissions reductions. The consumers groups are pushing the agenda in to the board rooms and out in the public in different ways.
    This will affect the way in which things used to be done in the past. Within the EU there is a push for phasing out boilers and the uptake of heat pumps in many industries is going better day by day
    IEA in their latest report state that the industry need to install 500MW heat pump capacity just to meet the heating requirements. To this comes the change in energy which is predicted to be hydrogen and ammonia.
    The EU Commission has suggested temperatures up to about 250°C or higher can be covered by heat pumps. Many industrial processes can be benefit from high temperature heat pumps and save money on the fuel bill.
    Heat pumps will be part of the CO2 emission free society’s back bone. With heat pumps you can recover heat from many levels and boost it to levels which is interesting for industry. More projects have shown that temperatures up to about 180°C is viable with today’s technology.
    Heat storage as part of the system is useful also for generating energy with heat-energy systems (often referred to as ORC). This can happen in one or two stages recovering heat from even very high temperature level e.g. flue gas from a burning process.
    The global warming is a big problem but the decarbonised future will come with cleaner air which today kills about 8-10 million people every year, according to WHO. But the change is also good for economy and many new jobs will be created in the slipstream of the change.
    There are about 5 million boilers in Europe and the people involved service and maintenance of these boilers will need to be requalified to work on heat pumps. This will put a lot of pressure on the training systems in Europe.
    Also logistics and the current infra structure in Europe will need an upgrade to H2 if it is to be widely distributed. H2 is a tricky little molecule that will penetrate even the smallest leaks. The gas lines we have for natural gas are not likely to meet the pressure codes need for H2 hence the upgrade needs.